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Where to get Cruelty-Free Manicures in London

Where to get Cruelty-Free Manicures in London

Hi everyone, how have you all been? I’ve been a little poorly, hence the lack of posts and slow responses to emails (*sorry*) but I hope that all of you are well. ☺

The search…

A little over a year ago I did a post on cruelty-free salons in London (5 Cruelty-free Salons in London), which is pretty self-explanatory. This time round I thought it would great to add to that list by showing you all places where you can get cruelty-free manicures in London.
Unfortuantely, most of the nail salons based here in London didn’t seem to mention much about the cruelty-free and vegan status of the products they use  – so it’s hard to tell whether they actually are cruelty-free or not just by looking at their websites.
 
​Just to give you all a quick heads up for those of you that think Shellac products are cruelty-free, their parent company, CND, have not responded to any emails regarding their cruelty-free status and they also haven’t responded to many other fellow bloggers (they seem a bit dodgy if you ask me).

Cruelty-free mani-pedis in London

nail berry manicure set image

1 | Nail Berry – Based in the Chelsea, Nail Berry are both a nail salon and brand dedicated to providing high-end quality manicures that are not only certified as cruelty-free, but are also free of chemicals and vegan.  I’ll definitely love to try out the Nail Berry nail polish some time soon. You can now get 10% off your first order when you subscribe to their newsletter.

 

nails inc manicure image

2 | Nails Inc. – Are another brand that provide products and have their own salon based across the U.K.  In London you can find them at Bond Street Fenwick, Canary Wharf, City London House of Fraser, Oxford St Debenhams, Oxford Street House of Fraser and Victoria House of Fraser. They provide a small vegan and halal manicure and pedicure range called Pure. I’m not sure about all the other treatments that they provide as they didn’t explicitly write vegan on anything else. When you subscribe to Nails Inc. online you get a 15% off discount code on their products and you can get 25% off when you purchase a course of treatments in store.

 

3 | Natural Urban Beauty Retreat – NUBR are based in North Finchley and have a number of SpaRitual vegan manicure and pedicure treatment​s ranging from £10-£45. You can book an appointment directly on their website or you can book an appointment via Treatwell and get up to 21%​ off​ the Spa Ritual Manicure and Pedicure​ treatment.

 

organic beauty salon image.

4 | Organic Beauty Salon – Is based in Brixton and also provide Spa Ritual treatments. I couldn’t find much information about the products that they use on their website, but I managed to find out via Treatwell that they use Spa Rituals for their normal manicure and pedicure treatments, please be aware that they do provide treatments using Shellac so make sure you’re doubling checking when booking or visiting.

If there are any that I’ve missed out then please do let me know! I hope you all enjoyed this guide on ‘Where to get Cruelty-Free Manicures in London’

Faux labels

Faux fur has increasingly been dominating the fashion scene, yet the concerns over the production of real fur is not as outdated of a problem as we like to think. Although we are led to believe that most of the major brands and retailers that typically sell faux fur are ethical and just, this is unfortunately not the case, in fact recently the problem of what I like to call ‘faux labels’ has been highlighted on many instances in the past few months. This particular problem is not a simple case of buy from this company and avoid that company due to the fact that the labelling itself cannot be trusted and this requires further investigation into the nature of the companies selling the supposed faux fur products.

Both the Daily Mail and The Sun uncovered the mislabelling on fur products in the past month from major companies like ASOS, TK Maxx, House of Fraser and Sports Direct. In the U.K there are laws that state that any products with fur has to be clearly labelled as to whether or not origin of the fur is from an animal, if this label is not available on the product then it is mostly likely real fur and is also breaking consumer laws. When you look at this problem on a more grander scale it seems to be quite a complex mess, as we in the U.K buy faux fur that looks and feels like real fur but most of our faux fur is imported from countries like China where there is no legislation to govern the production process. In China and across Asia many street animals are slaughtered, mislabelled and sold as faux fur in the U.K and there is not much questioning of the production behind the supposed faux fur due to the cheap availability of it.The price of fur with partial animal origin does not guarantee the living conditions of an animal neither does it justify a ‘humane’ method of obtaining fur.

I personally have difficulties telling the difference between real fur and fake fur so I looked up the different methods online and one that seemed to be (kind of) effective was to pick at strands of the fur and then to burn it to see if it burns like plastic, meaning it’s faux, or if it burns like hair, meaning it’s real. But of course you can’t walk around a store with a lighter and burn the products before you buy it so the safest way would be to do your own research into which companies genuinely do sell faux fur and which companies have a bad reputation of not sticking to their word.

I really do urge you all to become proactive in learning more about the companies that really do sell faux fur and the companies that are misleading. It won’t take as long as you think, there are many different resources available online like the Peta, Humane Society International, Cruelty Free International and Care2 websites as well as many blogs.